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Archive for the ‘javier ramirez’ Category

Pasting code into vi

Posted by javier ramirez on October 5, 2009

Every time I try to paste a big chunk of code into vi, it gets all messed up because of the autoindent. Each line gets indented taking the previous one as a reference, so when I try to paste something like..


global $wp_query;
parse_str($args, $r);
if (!isset($r['current'])) $r['current'] = -1;
if (!isset($r['show_all_parents'])) $r['show_all_parents'] = 0;
if (!isset($r['show_root'])) $r['show_root'] = 0;
if (!isset($r['list_tag'])) $r['show_root'] = 1;

..what I really get is..


global $wp_query;
  parse_str($args, $r);
    if (!isset($r['current'])) $r['current'] = -1;
      if (!isset($r['show_all_parents'])) $r['show_all_parents'] = 0;
        if (!isset($r['show_root'])) $r['show_root'] = 0;
          if (!isset($r['list_tag'])) $r['show_root'] = 1;

..and that’s no good. Fortunately the solution is really simple. Just enter command mode and write

:set paste

Now you can paste in all its glory. When you are done, you can get back to normal with

:set nopaste

So now you don’t have any excuses left to write original code. Get out there and copy the whole internet before I format it!!!

Posted in development, internet, javier ramirez, ubuntu | 10 Comments »

Ruby on Rails on unofficial Chrome OS

Posted by javier ramirez on September 29, 2009

update: I thought this Chrome OS distribution was THE google distro. I was wrong. It’s just someone who used SUSE Studio to make a customized version of Open SUSE around the Chromium theme. With the site being on a google site and the code on a google code repository, I thought this was it, but no.. this distro is totally unrelated to google.

Chrome OS is by now just a bit more than a curiosity. In the meanwhile, you can go and download a non-official distribution mimicking what it could be, but be warned, all you are going to get is an Open Suse distribution with Chromium installed and a blue theme with a cute logo. Hopefully the real ChromeOS will be much lighter and more user-friendly.

Starting the virtual appliance from VirtualBox is easy. You create a new virtual media with the virtual media manager and then a virtual machine using this new media. That should be it. If you leave the default options (64MB) you’ll end up with a really slow boot. I set the base memory to 512K and things are much better.

What will you find in this distribution apart from Chromium? Zip, Zero, Null.. or if you are into ruby, nil.

Truth is, this distribution is a bit too rough around the edges (when it comes to internationalization, even if it ask you for the keyboard settings, it will just ignore them), but being a SUSE, you can install whatever you want. The only thing you’ll need is the root password. Since I’m such a hacker it took me almost no time to realize the root password was “root” (my other options being “sergei”, “larry” and “640Koughttobeenough”.

Once you have root access, you can use Yast for installing anything you might need. Just for fun I installed ruby, rubygems and sqlite3 via Yast, and then rails using gem. I had to run a gem update –system so I could use rails 2.3.4 and I generated a scaffold to see if everything was fine. Well, it was :)

ruby on rails running on google chrome os

ruby on rails running on google chrome os

Well, even if it was utterly useless, at least I found a cool way of making customized SUSE distros in an easy way ;)

Posted in 1771, development, javier ramirez, ruby, ruby on rails | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

it’s not the framework, it’s you

Posted by javier ramirez on July 21, 2009

I’m getting tired already of the hype about Ruby on Rails and how it is better than any other framework past, present or future.

Sure Rails is a cute piece of software, and Ruby is a gorgeous language (supposing you are into programming languages, that is), but if you take a critical look at Rails, you could just say it’s another MVC framework.. Big deal.. And with some coupling issues between the layers too, which are fortunately being targeted on Rails 3.

Moreover, if you take a look at some of its components they could frankly be better. ActiveRecord, for example, is a wrapper ORM, which is implicitly tying you to the physical database layer, with one class per table, as opposed to a mapper ORM such as DataMapper or Hibernate. And the principle of least surprise is kind of a joke when it comes to some of the ActionView helpers and the parameters you have to pass along.

Still, as we like to say around here “Ruby on Rails mola infinito”, and it’s right now my favourite framework for non trivial web applications.

So.. what makes this framework so special? Is it only the absence of configuration and the sensible defaults? Would we sell ourselves for a couple of parlor tricks like those? Surely not.. specially with so many frameworks providing already sensible defaults. Come on, even in Java you can kind of forget about writing so much XML code if you make proper use of annotations and the like. No, it has to be something else.

Ruby on Rails has something that transcends the framework itself. It has you. The Mighty Developer. The Early Adopter. The Status Quo Challenger. The so-called Community —whatever that means.

Bottom line is, when I get together with people working with Rails, they are always in search of the holy grail of web development —or the nearest tavern, whatever comes first.. you have to love that kind of pragmatism. We like to break our assumptions, to learn new things and forget about the ones we already know.

We embrace Rails *today* but we are willing to embrace any other tool as long as we like it better. Do you remember the months before the Merb-Rails love affair? Half the Rails developers I know were already making eyes at Merb without the slightest hint of shame.

And by challenging the system, we are obliged to keep learning… and to find new ways to build the web. And instead of trying to make a carbon copy of what we did before, we like to start anew, because that’s where the fun is.

Sure you can argue this attitude is not the exclusive property of the Rails community. And I would second you on that based on theory.. but in practice, I have seen other some other communities lack this need of challenging. Maybe it’s because they have maturity models and certifications and black belts and whatnot…. And maybe having so many constraints is killing creativity; but fact is in some environments trying to take a step forward is seen as something odd, not desirable.

Rails will pass —or not— but as long as we keep alive the spirit of embracing change, we are entitled to be on the fun side of web development.

So, if you ask me, that’s the secret ingredient of Rails. Sure the language and the framework are cool, but the real power of Ruby on Rails is you.. and me.

update: please read the comments, since I was a bit ambiguous in the post and some points needed further explanation :)

Posted in internet, javier ramirez, madrid, ruby, ruby on rails | Tagged: , , , , , | 10 Comments »

it’s the end of the e-world as we know it

Posted by javier ramirez on July 7, 2009

Five years

I’ve been working for companies that didn’t last for so long. I’ve never been working in a company for so long come to think of it ;). I had best friends that didn’t last for so long either and I’ve seen plenty of marriages finishing much earlier than that.

Living on the world we live, it’s hard to remember exactly how it was five years ago. I’d say I was still using a landline for internet access. And I was sharing the 54K connection using a proxy.. how uncool is that? ;)

A bit over five years ago, gmail was launched.. More than five years later, gmail is finally removing the “beta” tag.

http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/google-apps-is-out-of-beta-yes-really.html

And I feel fine

Posted in internet, javier ramirez | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

sudo: rake: command not found

Posted by javier ramirez on July 6, 2009

I hate it when it happens, don’t you?

And it’s not only rake, but some other utilities too.

Bottom line is, in Ubuntu sudo is by default set to use a secure path. You can change the secure path if you are compiling from source, but we are talking Ubuntu here, the windows for the rest of us, so you get what your package says you get and that’s fine.

There are a couple of good solutions (other than switching to gentoo or slackware ;) )

If you want to use always the same PATH as you are using in your environment, you can just set an alias to sudo and make it set the PATH every time you are invoking it.

alias sudo=”sudo env PATH=$PATH”

It’s safe enough, but notice every time you are using sudo, you will be setting the environment to that of the calling user. Do your maths and reckon whether you are comfortable with that or not.

The option I chose is a bit pickier, making a link to the rake executable from /usr/local/bin, which is one of the secure paths.

sudo ln -s `which rake` /usr/local/bin/

Either way, your problem is solved. Now go save the world! You’re welcome ;)

Posted in javier ramirez, ruby, ubuntu | 3 Comments »

My slides for “Jruby on Rails: Ruby on Rails sobre la JVM”

Posted by javier ramirez on June 25, 2009

It was interesting to be at the Sun Open Communities Forum and meet people I used to work with (or even teach to) as back in time as in 1996.

It was also interesting to have the opportunity to introduce Ruby and Ruby on Rails to Java developers and show them how they could use it from the familiar JVM.

As usual, I uploaded to slideshare the slides I used in my presentation.

The layout might be a bit enterprisey for my standards, but I was representing my company, so I used the company template. Anyway, the presentation is under Creative Commons, so feel free to use it in any way you can imagine, as long as you respect the “non commercial attribution share alike” license.

Posted in conferences, development, javier ramirez, jruby, madrid, ruby, ruby on rails | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Speaking about JRuby on Rails at the Sun Open Communities Forum

Posted by javier ramirez on June 9, 2009

I’ve been invited to speak about JRuby on Rails at the Sun Open Communities Forum. This event is the evolution of the former editions of OpenJavaDay/OpenSolarisDay, revamped to include more Open Source communities.

Apart from the predictable “all-things-java” sessions, this year there are some interesting labs and talks about MySQL Scalability, REST, AJAX, the cloud, development frameworks and different languages running on the JVM.

Most of the talks, including mine, will be delivered in Spanish, but there will be some in English too.

My session will be

JRuby on Rails. Ruby on Rails on the JVM

And the excerpt I’ve sent for the talk goes something like this

Ruby is a dynamic programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity. Ruby on Rails is a web framework optimized for programmer happiness and sustainable productivity. The JVM is one of the world’s most heavily-optimized pieces of software. The combination of these three elements provides a superb platform for building web applications.

In my session I will explain the highlights of Ruby, how Ruby on Rails has changed the rules of web development, and how JRuby allows for the integration of Ruby (on Rails) and Java.

Inscription is free and if you cannot attend, there will be live streaming as well. Notice you also have to inscribe (checking the “Lo seguiré por internet” radio button) if you want to watch the streaming.

Posted in conferences, development, internet, javier ramirez, jruby, madrid, madridonrails, ruby, ruby on rails | 1 Comment »

install nokogiri and libxml on ubuntu

Posted by javier ramirez on May 28, 2009

a quick one..

the scenario:
you want to install nokogiri on ubuntu but you cannot get the gem to install because of unmet dependencies

the solution:

sudo apt-get install libxml2 libxml2-dev libxslt1-dev
sudo gem install nokogiri

the end

Posted in development, javier ramirez, ruby | Tagged: , | 14 Comments »

EuRuKo 2009 (Barcelona’s Edition)

Posted by javier ramirez on May 12, 2009

What a fantastic weekend it was.

I met interesting people, I learnt a bunch of new tricks, I had fun in the talks (and out of them too!), and it didn’t rain so we could hang out of the citilab building between sessions. win, win, win.

As you know I was a part of the organization, together with Aitor García Rey, David Calavera, Emili Parreño, Fernando Guillén, Jaime Iniesta, Jorge Cangas, Juanjo Bazán, Marcelino Llano, Miquel Oliete, Raúl Murciano, and Xavier Noria

It’s a real shame Aitor and David couldn’t attend finally due to personal issues, so they couldn’t receive the applause of the audience by the end of the conference. A big part of it belongs to them :)

Being a part of the organization it would be inelegant to say how good the event went, so let me just skip that part and go directly to my personal impressions.

If I had to provide a one-liner as a summary it would go something like “Everybody was as cool as everybody else.. and that was actually so cool!”.

Let me ellaborate on that for a while. We are software developers, and so we are divas at heart (I know I am one for sure). We have attitude, lots of attitude :) Some of us love to be at the spotlight, and others really enjoy to play the chamaleon and blend with the environment… but deep down we all have a lot of attitude and that shows in our disposition to work, in our way of coding, and in so many other things.

In the recent bob-against-giles debate, that kind of attitude was referred to as “arrogance” when talking about the smalltalk/C++ guys. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m all against generalizations -positive ones too- so I will not say everybody in those communities was arrogant. I would say it was a huge minority indeed. But.. the arrogance was there somewhere in those groups. And it is in so many facets of the software world. The rockstar developer myth.

And I thought that kind of arrogance existed in the Ruby community -whatever community means anyway- too. And I was proved wrong! There I was hanging around with common people, down to earth, as humble as you get.. and then I was shocked to know those people were actually developers like Mislav with so many world-level plugins, or Aslak contributing to the revolution of testing, or Tomasz doing black magic with code at the rythm of the metal, or Pratik and Xavier working in the shadow so we can get the best documentation ever, or Martha who knows so many things about so many subjects and delivers great presentations, and so many others. Not to mention the great Matsumoto San.

I was so surrounded by talent! and I couldn’t see even a single trace of rock star attitude… no looking down, no anything.. just openness and curiosity and a helping hand. And that ROCKS!

So, there.. that’s my summary of EuRuKo 2009. Sure there were also cool talks (and great delicious fantastic lighting talks!), and there was lot of partying, but you already knew that because it’s all documented in the euruko bot :)

What a fantastic weekend it was. Long live EuRuKo

Posted in conferences, EuRuKo, javier ramirez | Tagged: , , | 3 Comments »

Cucumber, Selenium, Webrat, and Windows

Posted by javier ramirez on April 27, 2009

I spent last Saturday hacking around with some really smart people in Madrid. It’s not widely known than in Spain there’s a thriving Ruby on Rails community -my guess would be a language thing- but if you take a look at some of the Rails patches, Hackfest winners or the official Rails documentation project, you would be surprised to see how many -and how good- contributions are coming from this side of the world.

Once in a while we like to get together and take code challenges, so we can learn from each other and eat pizza to match the stereotype ;)

Thing is I’m a Windows guy. I know I should be sorry, I know it’s for housewives (or househusbands for that matter), but that’s life. (disclaimer: I’m planning to switch to Ubuntu in the near future)

As you know, developing software in windows while entirely possible is a bit more difficult than in other systems, specially when it comes to compiling, forking and the like.

Last Saturday I was, as usual, the only windows at hand (the rest being a lot of Macs in different flavors and a lonely Ubuntu) and, as a part of the code challenge, I had to run some tests with Cucumber, Selenium and Webrat. Apart from libxml, that has been working flawlessly in my computer for months, no other binaries were involved, so you would think everything was working just fine.. well, think twice.

First problem was the test server couldn’t be started automatically. I didn’t investigate much about it (my guess being that a fork or a system call is being issued and Windows cannot cope with it) since it was easier just to start it manually before running the tests. Also it was faster, because it didn’t need to be started every time.

After this obstacle, when I was trying to run the tests, I was getting a cryptic Errno::EADDRNOTAVAIL message. At first I thought it was because of Selenium not being able to bind to the given port, but a quick test from the command line discarded that possibility.

I don’t know anything about webrat (yet) but as the song goes, with a little help from my friends I was able to locate the source of the problem. When connecting to remote control Selenium, Webrat is trying to bind to the address “0.0.0.0” and that’s something Windows doesn’t like.

All I had to do was opening the file “selecium_rc_server.rb” at the gem source and replacing “0.0.0.0” by “127.0.0.1”.

I was told I can do this much more clearly at the Webrat config, but I tried it out and I still had the same problem. Taking a look at the Webrat code I would say the config param is not honoured system-wide, but truth is I was in a hurry and I didn’t researched it thoroughly. I had a challenge to solve after all ;)

Once I did this, all was hunky dory. Selenium started, the form fields were filled in, the tests were passing (or not) and the result was displayed on my not-ansi console. Bummer.

Believe me, cucumber is not half the fun without the colors in the output. Fortunately enough, google can tell you where to find lots of ansi-aware console replacements. Unfortunately enough console2, my favourite, is not one of those.

So, there, it took a bit of extra work but now you can also run this neat stack in your good-old windows box.

Posted in development, javier ramirez, madrid, madridrb, ruby, ruby on rails, ruby on rails | Tagged: , , , | 6 Comments »